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Bandwidth Project – showing Retrofit and New development installation capabilities – Scotland

Bandwidth Project – showing Retrofit and New development installation capabilities – Scotland

Bandwidth Project – Showing Retrofit and New development installation capabilities

Scotland

LCITP

The Low Carbon Infrastructure Transition Programmes aim is to develop initiatives across Scotland that reduce Greenhouse emissions and maximise the potential of the sector. LCITP funding is helping to fund SHARC deployment across the chosen Bandwidth sites. This will play a major part in ensuring carbon reduction targets are met.

Project Overview

With the support of the LCITP, SHARC Energy Systems are installing our heat energy supply at several locations throughout Scotland. The Bandwidth project sites represent a diverse range of buildings requirements from island locations to Urban sites of historical importance that require a delicate and aesthetically respectful approach to installation. All sites are existing functioning public buildings, so minimal impact retrofit solutions and successful integration into their existing heat systems is of vital importance.

Retrofit Solutions:

Over 50% of energy consumed by buildings is in the form of heat so with 80% of the UK’s current building stock, expected to still be in use by 2050, it is essential to find a renewable heat retrofit solution that is efficient and effective in meeting the thermal loads of these buildings.  The SHARC solution provides the opportunity to retrofit our technology, with no upfront capital required by the client, enabling them to achieve their carbon reduction targets whilst at the same time-saving cost against fossil fuel generated heat.

The Bandwidth Sites

The energy centres at all sites are designed to fit in only a small footprint that is sympathetic to the location and ensures a minimum of time installing the system.

Aqualibrium:

The Aqualibrium Leisure Centre in Campbeltown provides a large swimming pool and a wide range of other leisure services. Installing SHARC technology at the site will help Argyll & Bute Council achieve their Renewable Energy Action Plan targets and deliver a long-term price certain solution.

The leisure centre currently uses 5 no. 135kW gas boilers to generate space heating, pool heating and domestic hot water. The gas consumption from Apr 2014 – Mar 2015 was 1,516,204kWh with a peak demand of 632kW.

The proposed SHARC solution will have a Peak capacity of 800KW and will aim to supply 90% of the leisure centre’s annual demand. An estimated carbon saving of 144 tonnes of CO2 per year is expected, that will increase annually as the Electricity grid decarbonises.

 

 

 

Kelvingrove:

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is located in the North West of Glasgow city centre between the Rivers Kelvin and Clyde. It regularly attracts over 1 million visitors per year. The gallery is home to over 8,000 objects and recently underwent a £28 million 3-year renovation. The building is a historic Grade A listed building and is operated by Glasgow City Council.

The building currently uses 4no natural gas Viessmann Vitocrossal 300 boilers rated at 895kW each on a duty standby basis. The gas consumption from Apr 2014 – Mar 2015 was 1,720,587kWh with a peak demand of 1108kW.

The proposed SHARC solution will be a packaged plant room located in the grounds of the museum, with a peak capacity of 1,400 KW and will aim to supply 100% of the site’s annual demand. An estimated carbon saving of 175 tonnes of CO2 per year is expected, that will increase annually as the Electricity grid decarbonises.

 

 

Pickaquoy:

The Pickaquoy leisure centre is located on the Orkney Islands and operated by the Pickaquoy Centre Trust. The Centre includes several swimming pools and diverse leisure facilities, including a 1,600-seater hall and a cinema.

The building currently uses 4no oil fired Ideal Harrier GTS boilers rated at 330kW max each with a total capacity of 1,320kW. The oil consumption during the year 2015 was 2,036,661 kWh with a peak demand of 900Kw.

The proposed SHARC solution will be a packaged plant room located in the grounds of the centre, with a peak capacity of 1,000 KW and will aim to supply 95% of the site’s annual demand. An estimated carbon saving of 400 tonnes of CO2 per year is expected, that will increase annually as the Electricity grid decarbonises.

 

 

 

Financing the service:

Our financial model is particularly supportive of sites like this.

Through our heat supply service, SHARC Energy cover the Capital investment to facilitate the Design and Build of our systems.

Once in operation, the heat supply charge, which is often as competitive as the fossil fuel we are replacing, covers the operations cost of, Electricity to run the system, Service and maintenance charges throughout the life of the agreement, replacement parts during the contact life etc.

Public buildings often have some challenging budgets to work with so enabling the deployment of renewable technology without CAPEX outlay as a replacement to existing energy suppliers is a real benefit to these sites. The heat supply cost is capped against the market throughout the life of the agreement so building managers can account for fuel price certainty, protected against a fluctuating market. Servicing and maintenance costs of the system are included in the agreement undertaken by local suppliers within the community who are trained and managed by SHARC to provide all the site servicing.

19/11/2017